Friday, October 6, 2017

The Long and Winding Road by TJ Klune


Family is not always defined by blood. It’s defined by those who make us whole—those who make us who we are.

And here, at the end, Bear and Otter will be tested like they’ve never been before.

There’s a knock at the door from a little girl who has nowhere else to go.

There’s a phone ringing, bringing news they do not expect.

There’s a brother returning home after learning how to stand on his own.

As these moments converge, all of their lives will change forever.

Beginning in Bear, Otter, and the Kid, and continuing in Who We Are and The Art of Breathing, TJ Klune has told a saga of family and brotherhood, of love and sacrifice. In this final chapter, the events of the past pave the long and winding road toward a future no one could have imagined.

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Book 4
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Reviews by the Wicked Reads Review Team

Sarah☆☆☆☆☆
I struggled to read through my tears as I came to the end of this story. I’ve grown up alongside Bear, Ty, and Otter and they have all become intensely real to me.

This is the end of Bear and Otter’s ‘adulting.’ As always, the almost lyrical quality to TJ Klune’s writing kept me entranced. In this story, Bear and Otter are the same age as me and some of Bear’s poignant observations of his life, his love, and his family made me pause and reflect. I loved Bear’s thoughts about his and Otter’s happiness being hard earned.

This last book is the slowest and the most domestic of the series. Pregnancy, babies, and marital struggles aren’t terribly exciting topics and Bear and Otter’s settled, adult life doesn’t provide a whole lot of conflict. Bear and Ty continue to work through their complex relationships with their mother and both must deal with grief and loss.

Time jumps a little erratically in this book and I often found myself wanting more of something mentioned or skimmed and less of the more mundane domestic details. It is difficult to conclude such an involved series and I enjoyed the string of epilogues at the end (especially Otter’s narration). This is a story for those who have followed Bear, Ty, and Otter from the start – new readers need to start at the beginning – and I dare any fans not to shed a few tears as they say goodbye to longtime friends.



When TJ Klune was eight, he picked up a pen and paper and began to write his first story (which turned out to be his own sweeping epic version of the video game Super Metroid—he didn't think the game ended very well and wanted to offer his own take on it. He never heard back from the video game company, much to his chagrin). Now, two decades later, the cast of characters in his head have only gotten louder, wondering why he has to go to work as a claims examiner for an insurance company during the day when he could just stay home and write. He recently went slightly insane and moved to the East Coast from the Sonoran Desert with his fiancé and neurotic cat in tow. He dreams about one day standing at Stonehenge, just so he can say he did.

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https://www.dreamspinnerpress.com


Reviewers on the Wicked Reads Review Team were provided a free copy of The Long and Winding Road (Bear, Otter, and the Kid #4) by TJ Klune to read and review.

6 comments:

  1. I have to be in the mood to read a tear jerker and I think TJ Klune's BOATK series had to be one of my favourite tear jerker reads and also Amy Lane's "Keeping Promise Rock" series.

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  2. I like them as long as the characters end up together and not with a not someone dying in a near future. Otherwise, I can't stand them. Sloane Kennedy's books are pretty good.

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  3. I sometimes enjoy a good tearjerker. It has to have a HEA though and I have to be in a good place mentally.

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  4. I don't mind a tear jerker from time to time especially if it ends in a HEA. I have to say some of the best ended bittersweet, like Immortal by Amy Lane.

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  5. Nope. I prefer either intense OR fluffy.

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  6. One of my all time favorite tearjerkers is "Their Eyes Were Watching God" by Zora Neal Hurston, but my most recent favorite is TJ Klune's "Olive Juice"--so many feels!

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