Saturday, December 3, 2016

Private Truths by C.B. Lewis


For two role models with their reputations on the line, privacy might be a luxury they can’t afford, and love might be impossible.

After returning from service, Army veteran Jack McCall fought his way back from addiction and joined a charity supporting homeless veterans in London, where he became an inspiration to others. He approaches Edward Marsden, Viscount Routhsley, a known playboy and philanthropist, about sponsorship for his charity. To his surprise, Edward isn’t the shallow pleasure-seeker everyone assumes, and he and Edward share many interests. Little by little, they are drawn together in spite of the different worlds they come from.

But for two men in the public eye, happiness won’t be so easily achieved. Edward fears coming out as gay will shift attention from his charity work, and Jack worries his relationship with the aristocrat will undermine the integrity of his foundation. They come under intense scrutiny, leading to an inevitable clash between Jack and the press who won’t stop harassing them. As what they’ve built comes crashing down, Jack and Edward must make a choice: continue presenting the facade the public expects, or expose the private truths in their hearts so they can be together.

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Reviews by the Wicked Reads Review Team

Sarah☆☆☆☆
I thoroughly enjoyed this story about a retired army officer from a humble background falling for the Viscount who sponsors his charity. Jack is inspiring. Released from the Army after a serious injury, he spends his time running a charity for homeless veterans. He is absolutely charming even if he’s a little rough around the edges. Edward has money and status, but he also spends his time working on charity ventures.

There is some suspense in this story as Jack finds himself facing assault charges and both men find themselves hounded by the tabloids. The many plot threads make this a long and at times slightly complicated story.

I struggled a little with Edward’s character. His speech and actions feel dated. He really doesn’t speak or act like a contemporary toff. His language is far too formal and he reads at least a generation older than he actually is. Similarly, as an officer, Jack should have been much more comfortable in formal situations and far less in awe of Edward when they meet. There was something awkward and stilted in the dialogue between these two men that made it slightly difficult to believe in their romance.

I enjoyed the whole cast of characters together – from Jack’s Northern small town friends to Edward’s important family to Jack’s charity coworkers, there is an incredibly diverse group of well-developed and enjoyable characters in this story.

The romance between these two men is sweet and slow, and there are more scenes of comfort and friendship than sex.



C.B. LEWIS is small and Scottish and can often be spotted perched around historical monuments with her notepad and pen. She has been writing and telling tales for almost as long as she can remember and has a brain that constantly fizzes with an abundance of ideas. If she’s not working on half a dozen things at once, it should be considered a slow day.

She loves to travel and just has one continent left to complete her travel bingo card. A lot of the travel has also been research-based, and if pointed at any historical event, she will research it vociferously, just because she can.

Normally she is based in Edinburgh, where she tends toward the hermit lifestyle, needing nothing but a kettle, a constant supply of tea, and—of course—the Internet. There are no cats, no puppies, no significant others, only a lot of ideas and an awful lot of typing. And occasionally, cake. Never forget the cake.

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https://www.dreamspinnerpress.com


Reviewers on the Wicked Reads Review Team were provided a free copy of Private Truths by C.B. Lewis to read and review.

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